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Cambridge research nurses win a 'nursing Oscar' for Clinical Research Nursing

last modified Jan 21, 2016 10:00 AM

Research nurses at the NIHR Cambridge BioResource (CBR) have won the 2015 Nursing Times Award for Clinical Research Nursing. The award is in recognition of their work to promote volunteer engagement and delivery of research studies.

Located on the Cambridge University Hospital (CUH) campus, the NIHR Cambridge BioResource is a resource of thousands of volunteers who can be invited to take part in research studies investigating the links between genes, the environment, health and disease.

The NIHR Cambridge BioResource team includes seven research nurses, led by Lead Research Nurse, Kelly Beer. The nurses’ role includes coordination of research studies, collection of blood samples and clinical data, and recruitment of volunteers.

The nursing team work in close collaboration with research and support staff within the NIHR Cambridge BioResource to ensure that research targets are achieved. They also work with a range of partners, such as the MRC, University of Cambridge, NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) and the JDRF/WT Diabetes and Inflammation Laboratory.

The Nursing Times Awards are dubbed the ‘Oscars of the nursing world’, and profile good practice and outstanding nursing achievement. The awards are highly regarded within the nursing and healthcare sector.

The team were shortlisted for the Clinical Research Nursing category for their entry detailing the model of research nursing they have developed, focusing on their volunteer-centric approach, and their interest in raising the profile of research nurses.

In September, the nursing team presented their entry to a judging panel, which included representatives from the NIHR and the Department of Health. They competed with nine other organisations for the prestigious award, including the James Paget University Hospitals Foundation Trust, the Evelina London Children Hospital at Guy's & St Thomas, and Doncaster Royal Infirmary.

On Thursday 12 November, colleagues from the healthcare sector came together for a night of recognition and celebration at the Nursing Times Awards ceremony at Grosvenor House, Park Lane, where the Cambridge BioResource nurses were announced as the winners of the Clinical Research Nursing category.

ClinicalResearchNursing

On winning the award, Kelly said: “We are thrilled to have received this award and I am delighted that the nurses have been recognised for the special work that they do in engaging volunteers and facilitating research.

“The award is a great recognition of the hard work of the CBR team in building a successful research resource. We are grateful for the support from the Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre and the NIHR, and we look forward to using this award to further our work in promoting excellence in the delivery of research nursing.”

Professor John Bradley, Director of Research & Development commented on the nurses’ success: This is a fantastic achievement, recognising the unique contribution the NIHR Cambridge BioResource make to engaging the local community in world class clinical research.”

Dr Nick Watkins, Assistant Director, Research and Development for NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) commented: “NHSBT has been a long-time partner of the NIHR Cambridge BioResource and we have worked together to support the enrolment of blood donors into this BioResource.  We are delighted that The Nursing Times has recognised the outstanding work of the BioResource team through this award.”

Jenni Middleton, Editor, Nursing Times, said: “The nurses who have won this year – and those who are finalists – are smart, innovative and making real changes to the way that patients are cared for. Nursing care is no longer about bedpans and bandages – nurses contribute much more than that and influence every aspect of care and we need to make sure that the public, the media and the policymakers understand that. This year, HRH the Prince of Wales asked to be involved in The Nursing Times Awards through a special award – The HRH Award for Integrated Approaches to Care. He wanted to acknowledge the huge contribution that nurses make and knows it’s essential that they are recognised and their great work disseminated. That’s what these awards do – in all our categories.

Well done to all of our finalists and winners, they have much to be proud of as they have truly made a difference to patients, residents, service users and those who love them. It is a fantastic achievement.”